Ardern, Notley represent different kind of politics

(April 4, 2019)

There is a sign making the rounds on social media that reads, “You know it’s time for a change when children act like leaders and leaders act like children.”

In a long string of recent childish behaviours from leaders, the one exception was Jacinda Ardern, prime minister of New Zealand. She won public admiration for her response to the mass shootings in Christchurch, even from countries where female political leadership is a rarity.

Countries like Canada, in fact. While we celebrate our own Nellie McClung and the other four women who won the “Persons” case, there are far too few women in politics. What’s more, most women who are in politics still seem to hit the glass ceiling when it comes to the top roles.

So as Ardern’s picture was cast on the side of the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, headscarf and hug, I thought of another oilpatch thousands of kilometres away where Rachel Notley is trying to become the first re-elected female premier in Canadian history.

In 2018, it didn’t turn out so well for Kathleen Wynne and the people of Ontario. Wynne’s Liberals were not only erased at the polls, but the combination of anti-Wynne sentiment and stay-at-home voters meant Doug Ford was elected premier instead. It will take the province at least a generation to repair the damage Ford has already done, especially on environmental issues.

That’s a generation we don’t have, as the slide toward 2 C global warming continues.

It was a replay (on a smaller scale, with fewer tweets) of what happened in the last U.S. presidential election. Hillary Clinton would have been the first female president in that country, but similar attitudes (and perhaps a bit of Russian meddling) put Donald Trump in the Oval Office instead, with much worse consequences for the planet and for America’s role in global affairs.

Yet when you consider that men (of all colours) inflict military, economic and sexual violence on victims everywhere every day, and that none of the high-profile shooters who have killed children in schools or people at prayer have been female, it is hard not to wonder whether female leaders would do things differently than their male counterparts.

At the very least, women in political leadership deserve to be judged for their character and competence, and not ruled out simply because of their gender.

So, while I have frequently criticized Rachel Notley for her decisions as premier, she has brought a new and different tone to politics in Alberta — a place that previously had one-party rule for longer than anywhere except the Soviet Union, with about as little social tolerance for dissent. In 2015, Albertans not only elected a woman as premier, but one leading an NDP government, and (contrary to predictions) their world did not come to an end.

For the record, Notley is tough and smart, driven by a concern for her constituents and not pulled along by the ideological golden nose ring that her Opposition counterparts (such as Jason Kenney) wear so proudly.

Like many leaders before her, however, she is unfortunately still addicted to doing lines of pipe, instead of finding other and more sustainable ways to make Alberta great again.

But I remember the days of the Heritage Fund, those billions of dollars squirrelled away to ensure Alberta’s future, even occasionally paying dividends. As a native Albertan, living elsewhere for most of my life, I was envious of those who still lived in the Land of No PST.

For years, however, money that should have helped build that fund has been squandered. It could have been used to transition the province away from being a one-cow operation, but it wasn’t. There was no vision at all, as the old white guys in leadership instead wallowed in their bank vaults like Scrooge McDuck.

It was the One Party that made those choices, pulled along by its own nose by financial interests from offshore. It had no concern for future generations — in a pirate economy, focused on plundering public resources for private profit, how could there be?

Certainly, Alberta politics and this election campaign have been marred by the kind of juvenile behaviour that the social media sign deplores. Canada needs leaders like Jacinda Ardern, including female ones, but we don’t need to import them from New Zealand.

I am not saying Notley should win re-election in Alberta because she is a woman, however. That would demean the significant contributions she and her government have made to the province and to Canada in the past four years.

But I am saying that, in 2019, she certainly should not lose the election because she is a woman.

If the misogynists join forces again with the people who don’t vote, it would mean the dinosaurs still rule the Alberta badlands after all.

And, just like in Ontario and the United States, that could spell disaster for everyone.

Read more