Personal attacks just lazy campaigning

(October 17, 2019)

In the critical thinking course I teach, the easiest logical fallacy to illustrate is ad hominem.

Attack the person, because you can’t attack their argument. It’s easy to illustrate, because I just use examples from our election campaigns.

Given the latest provincial results, ad hominem attacks work. At least, this is what the political strategists will say while planning for next time. For me, I recall the 1960s Simon and Garfunkel song Mrs. Robinson, in which after listening to the candidates debate, the lyrics continue: “Laugh about it, shout about it, when you’ve got to choose — any way you look at it, you lose.”

That’s how I felt after the federal leaders English-language debate. Regardless of who slings the mud and whether or not it sticks, we all lose. I am tired of all the ad hominem attacks in this campaign, because they reveal the hollowness of Canadian democracy.

There is no real leadership — instead, we get grandiose promises losers will never have to keep and winners will choose to ignore. We can change governments, but never seem to get ahead.

The Liberal government began with a honeymoon, because it rolled back the most miserable and inane decisions of the Harper Conservative government. When it came to keeping its own election promises, there was no electoral reform and Indigenous Peoples received treatment little different than before.

On the environmental front, the federal government bought a leaky old pipeline and trampled both Indigenous land rights and environmental review processes with the intention of ramming through new ones.

With the New Democratic Party, I thought Jagmeet Singh’s brightly coloured turban would have made him stand out in the last Parliament’s affairs, even before he had a seat in the House. But he was painfully absent from much of Canada most of the time until the election campaign began.

If there were NDP policy alternatives to Trudeau schmooze and Scheer bafflegab, they were buried in somebody’s desk in Ottawa when they should have been peddled (pun intended) across the country like Singh’s book.

The only bright spot in the past four years was Elizabeth May getting arrested for protesting against the pipeline — having the guts to take a stand for what was right, rather than what was politic. That action matched her actions as leader, with her personal convictions and the Green party’s policies — a remarkable triple play, because it is so rare in Canadian politics. Her lone voice is not alone anymore, but she remains, at best, most people’s second choice for prime minister.

The fortunes of the Trudeau government waxed and waned with Trudeau’s own — from clumsily wearing costumes to SNC-Lavalin controversies, from gender-balanced cabinet crowing to eating crow as he sacked Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott, from party face to brownface to red face, as he went on his apology tour for past indiscretions.

Turning to the Conservatives, Andrew Scheer still makes people nervous, because every time he speaks, we are left wondering if another Harper-style, ego-driven autocrat lurks behind his pudgy dimples and vague promises.

And, as we wonder about Scheer, right-wing governments elsewhere (in the hands of U.S. President Donald Trump, Ontario Premier Doug Ford and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney) find new and disturbing ways to shatter the lives of ordinary people, stealing headlines and attention from the crucial issues the world desperately needs to address.

Scheer has had his own misfires — including his U.S. citizenship reveal. Trudeau’s debate zinger that People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier says out loud what Scheer is only thinking is hard for the Conservatives to refute, given their platform on such trigger issues restricting immigration and reducing foreign aid to underdeveloped countries.

But after walking the streets of Winnipeg with 12,000 other people last month, I think the biggest failure of all these players is their weak-kneed response to the climate crisis. We need a coalition for the planet that crosses party lines and sidelines the egos of all their leaders in favour of working together for the common good. If we want a better future for all of our children, then business as usual can’t continue. Climate change requires us to change. Now.

Scheer and his Conservatives dodge that reality, among others — refusing to participate in debates on climate issues and effectively pretending the world has stood still since 1955. Trudeau and his Liberals offer more hope, but need to convince voters their plans are not just green paint over the same old pipeline, and more election promises that won’t be kept.

For the NDP, the climate crisis is one of their key issues, but wanting change is not the same as having a practical plan to make it happen.

Colour me Green? Maybe — but certainly no blue face this time for me.

In the current climate, it’s too risky.

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