In election aftermath, women should lead

(November 4, 2019)

We could subtitle most of the recent news “Life in the Aftermath.”

Tornadoes in Alabama, wildfires in California, a super typhoon in Japan, a hurricane in the Bahamas — and October snowstorms in Manitoba. Natural disasters seem increasing in number, severity and their effects on people’s lives.

Then there are the political disasters, whose effects may be similarly devastating: the daily, serial consequences of Donald Trump’s presidency, at home and abroad; the loud sucking sounds of Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s Brexit as the United Kingdom circles the drain; and “Buck-a-Beer” Premier Doug Ford’s chaotic mismanagement of the province of Ontario.

In Canada, we are assessing the aftermath of our federal election and what a fragmented Parliament might mean at a time when decisive and wise leadership for all Canadians is required.

Desperation politics paid off at the end for the Trudeau Liberals, though (even in hiding) Ford really was the liability that Scheer’s Conservatives feared would cost them Ontario.

But more than anyone else, Catherine McKenna deserves major credit for the Liberal minority win. Somehow, it was McKenna’s voice — not Justin Trudeau’s last-minute environmental hyperbole — that convinced enough Canadians that the leaky-pipeline-buying plutocrats were greener than they appeared.

She deserves to continue in her role as minister of environment and climate change, because — often alone — she consistently maintained her focus, her credibility and her poise in the face of opposition from outside and sabotage from within caucus. Given the minority government, needing to co-operate with the New Democratic Party and the Green party to prevent an early election, McKenna should also be made deputy prime minister.

I have watched her interact with people up close, and she is in person what she projects at the microphone. The Liberals desperately need that kind of personal integrity and credibility if they expect to govern for four more years — and it’s about time that the women still left in the Trudeau cabinet had a chance to lead from the front.

Environmental portfolios too often are seen as places to park the second-string, weaker players, where they can plant a few trees and take some nice pictures, while the big boys (for example) buy pipelines and take care of business, especially for themselves.

In an age of climate crisis, this has to change. We need strong, determined leadership in environmental areas, whether it is with regard to climate change, sustainable development or a transition to a low-carbon economy. McKenna deserves that opportunity to lead, for the benefit of all Canadians.

This last Liberal government’s record on the environment was only good in comparison to the Harper government’s catastrophically bad record — a bad record that Andrew Scheer still seems determined to beat, if given an opening.

But there was a clear indication of who was calling the shots before in Ottawa, when McKenna and then-natural resources minister Jim Carr were summoned to a sundown press conference on the West Coast to announce the pipeline approval. Having been told what others — especially Bill Morneau — had already decided, they then had to shill for what was a monumental error in political, economic and ecological judgment.

Carr got his bounce back when he was moved to a spot in which he could follow his heart, as minister of international trade diversification, but McKenna soldiered on. Because of her determination and constant efforts to pluck local green victories from the jaws of policy disaster, she gave Trudeau’s Liberals a breath of a chance to be seen as a better environmental alternative than Scheer’s Conservatives — for the moment, anyway.

What Trudeau will do with that breath of a chance remains to be seen. If he is smart (or has acquired better advisers since SNC-Lavalin), he will appoint McKenna his deputy and take a long vacation out of the public eye, perhaps to wherever Doug Ford went.

McKenna understands the dynamics of the climate crisis better than the boys from Bay Street ever will. She is more likely able to start fresh with the other leaders on the Green New Deal that the rank and file of their parties want to see happen — and has no history of wearing anything other than a green face when it comes to working for what all Canadians need.

After a nasty election campaign, Canadians need a break from both Trudeau and Scheer. The leaders need some family time, as dads, since that is what they both see as their most important roles — perhaps the only area of their lives where apologies are not regularly required.

Frankly, we also need a break from dads-in-power. Catherine McKenna is a mother, and marched with her daughters. No mother (or grandmother) ever needs to apologize for protecting her cubs and giving them what they need for life.

Perhaps the women should lead. For a change.

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Personal attacks just lazy campaigning

(October 17, 2019)

In the critical thinking course I teach, the easiest logical fallacy to illustrate is ad hominem.

Attack the person, because you can’t attack their argument. It’s easy to illustrate, because I just use examples from our election campaigns.

Given the latest provincial results, ad hominem attacks work. At least, this is what the political strategists will say while planning for next time. For me, I recall the 1960s Simon and Garfunkel song Mrs. Robinson, in which after listening to the candidates debate, the lyrics continue: “Laugh about it, shout about it, when you’ve got to choose — any way you look at it, you lose.”

That’s how I felt after the federal leaders English-language debate. Regardless of who slings the mud and whether or not it sticks, we all lose. I am tired of all the ad hominem attacks in this campaign, because they reveal the hollowness of Canadian democracy.

There is no real leadership — instead, we get grandiose promises losers will never have to keep and winners will choose to ignore. We can change governments, but never seem to get ahead.

The Liberal government began with a honeymoon, because it rolled back the most miserable and inane decisions of the Harper Conservative government. When it came to keeping its own election promises, there was no electoral reform and Indigenous Peoples received treatment little different than before.

On the environmental front, the federal government bought a leaky old pipeline and trampled both Indigenous land rights and environmental review processes with the intention of ramming through new ones.

With the New Democratic Party, I thought Jagmeet Singh’s brightly coloured turban would have made him stand out in the last Parliament’s affairs, even before he had a seat in the House. But he was painfully absent from much of Canada most of the time until the election campaign began.

If there were NDP policy alternatives to Trudeau schmooze and Scheer bafflegab, they were buried in somebody’s desk in Ottawa when they should have been peddled (pun intended) across the country like Singh’s book.

The only bright spot in the past four years was Elizabeth May getting arrested for protesting against the pipeline — having the guts to take a stand for what was right, rather than what was politic. That action matched her actions as leader, with her personal convictions and the Green party’s policies — a remarkable triple play, because it is so rare in Canadian politics. Her lone voice is not alone anymore, but she remains, at best, most people’s second choice for prime minister.

The fortunes of the Trudeau government waxed and waned with Trudeau’s own — from clumsily wearing costumes to SNC-Lavalin controversies, from gender-balanced cabinet crowing to eating crow as he sacked Jody Wilson-Raybould and Jane Philpott, from party face to brownface to red face, as he went on his apology tour for past indiscretions.

Turning to the Conservatives, Andrew Scheer still makes people nervous, because every time he speaks, we are left wondering if another Harper-style, ego-driven autocrat lurks behind his pudgy dimples and vague promises.

And, as we wonder about Scheer, right-wing governments elsewhere (in the hands of U.S. President Donald Trump, Ontario Premier Doug Ford and Alberta Premier Jason Kenney) find new and disturbing ways to shatter the lives of ordinary people, stealing headlines and attention from the crucial issues the world desperately needs to address.

Scheer has had his own misfires — including his U.S. citizenship reveal. Trudeau’s debate zinger that People’s Party of Canada Leader Maxime Bernier says out loud what Scheer is only thinking is hard for the Conservatives to refute, given their platform on such trigger issues restricting immigration and reducing foreign aid to underdeveloped countries.

But after walking the streets of Winnipeg with 12,000 other people last month, I think the biggest failure of all these players is their weak-kneed response to the climate crisis. We need a coalition for the planet that crosses party lines and sidelines the egos of all their leaders in favour of working together for the common good. If we want a better future for all of our children, then business as usual can’t continue. Climate change requires us to change. Now.

Scheer and his Conservatives dodge that reality, among others — refusing to participate in debates on climate issues and effectively pretending the world has stood still since 1955. Trudeau and his Liberals offer more hope, but need to convince voters their plans are not just green paint over the same old pipeline, and more election promises that won’t be kept.

For the NDP, the climate crisis is one of their key issues, but wanting change is not the same as having a practical plan to make it happen.

Colour me Green? Maybe — but certainly no blue face this time for me.

In the current climate, it’s too risky.

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As youth follow Thunberg’s lead, what are the adults doing?

(September 25, 2019)

“The adults have failed us.”

The message Swedish teenager Greta Thunberg has delivered clearly and consistently for the past year, from her spot outside the Swedish parliament to the UN, is simple and direct.

We are in a global crisis and the adults in charge of everything have done nothing to solve it.

It’s not about getting more information — we have all we need. It’s also not about figuring out what to do — we already know.

The adults have failed us, she says, because they have done nothing. The future of all the children of Earth is literally going up in smoke.

Every day we don’t act, the situation gets worse and more of that future disappears. Species go extinct, at the rate of 200 per day. The air is fouled, the water is filled with toxins and plastic, the food becomes unhealthy or scarce — this is what her future holds, as the landscape becomes dry, barren and unlivable.

She calmly observes there are no politics to change that reality, just yet.

In Canada, the federal election campaign was launched before the dust of the provincial election settled here in Manitoba. Her observation, unfortunately, continues to be true for us.

You could argue — though I would disagree — that business and industry have no responsibility to care for people or for the planet, that narrow-minded self-interest excuses their lack of social responsibility. But politicians, especially in a democracy, have responsibilities to everyone.

While we could also argue about the details of those responsibilities, clearly one of them should be preventing the end of civilization as we know it. Yet the response of all provincial parties to the climate crisis was pathetic, and I fear the federal parties will do no better.

In Manitoba, we have a renewed majority for a government that made indifference and inaction on environmental issues for the past three years into a perverse point of pride, preferring absence to engagement on those issues during the campaign.

The rest of the parties were no better. The climate crisis was ignored by the NDP in favour of a Throwback Thursday routine on health care, and while it was an earnest (but unconvincing) plank in the Liberal platform, for some inexplicable reason a sustainable future was sidelined even by the Green party, whose climate policies were pale green at best.

So, not surprisingly, many Manitobans ignored their own responsibility and stayed home. But there is no point to calling a society democratic when the people don’t vote.

The single biggest reason I heard for this dereliction of duty was, “Why vote, when nothing ever changes?”

There is truth in that reaction. Against the apathy and environmental inaction of the Progressive Conservative party — which once again garnered about 40 per cent or so of the vote — the other parties postured their 60 per cent share into inevitable defeat.

The politics of a sustainable future requires a coalition for the planet, where the best and brightest members of all parties — or none — find a way to work together for the radical transformation that our world so desperately needs.

Thunberg also reminds us individual choices matter, that what each of us does changes the world, in one direction or another.

On Friday, children will be following her lead and striking for the climate in more than 100 countries.

In Manitoba, they will be at the legislature from noon onward, to try to convince this next group of provincial politicians that — together — they must do what needs to be done, so these children can grow toward a future in which they are able to live.

But on that day, and in the aftermath of that global climate strike, where will the adults be? Will they be standing with the children, or standing against them?

Where will you be? Will you change how you live, the choices you make, every day? Or will you instead look into the eyes of your children and grandchildren and tell them you simply don’t care what happens to them?

We are faced with that kind of black or white choice. If nothing else, at least be honest — follow Thunberg’s example and be clear and direct about what you think and what matters most to you. Have the guts to tell the children, to their faces, that you intend to let their future burn.

If you can go on making those same choices as before, after you watch the children strike on Friday, then my Canada — and my world — really is upside down.

Thunberg and others have wondered whether the climate crisis is too important to be left to the politicians to solve. They must also be wondering if the climate crisis is too important for the adults to be left in charge any longer.

We will see what they decide.

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