Mother Nature will show Tories to the exit

(March 29, 2018)

Premier Brian Pallister has accomplished the unthinkable.

To the dismay of his colleagues and the delight of the opposition parties, Pallister will be remembered for blowing the largest electoral advantage in the history of Manitoba politics and leading the first single-term government since Sterling Lyon was defeated in 1980.

While there are already many other reasons for his meltdown (Manitoba Hydro, health care and education are contenders) future pundits will point to Pallister’s mismanagement of environmental issues as the central reason for this debacle.

And it will be Pallister who wears this defeat, not the Progressive Conservative party. His cabinet ministers are left to shrug helplessly at news conferences or in the legislature, when they are pushed to explain the latest flailing.

To date, we have seen little of the much-trumpeted “made-in-Manitoba” climate plan. After months of consultations with many organizations and individuals who took the time to offer constructive, non-partisan ideas and advice about managing greenhouse gas emissions and spending carbon-tax revenue — in both public consultations and online surveys, however inadequate and last-minute — the latest budget ignored them all.

It is becoming a perfect storm of Pallister’s own making. Mother Nature will provide the background chorus, as extreme weather patterns worsen over the next couple of years before the provincial election. The Manitoba Liberals have announced a policy platform that includes a raft of reasonable things — none of them new — that should already have been included in a Tory climate plan for Manitoba, but weren’t.

In these pages, for example, I have argued for two years we could make the province “carbon negative” and called on Premier Pallister to resign and let someone else try, if the Green Plan is the best his government can do (Premier’s green plan takes province nowhere, Nov. 2, 2017).

Of course, this is not the only trouble brewing. When the Winnipeg Chamber of Commerce expresses dismay at the budget, the Manitoba Heavy Construction Association calls out the government for promises unkept, the health-care unions splutter about shortfalls in essential services, the post-secondary institutions object to doing ever more with even less, and even the blue-chip, Pallister-appointed board of Manitoba Hydro quits en masse, things are not coming up roses for the government.

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Carbon Tax Won’t Drive Change

(December 15, 2016)

We live between two basic truths about the choices we make: the society that lives for today at the expense of tomorrow has no future, but the society that lives for tomorrow at the expense of today will not survive to enjoy it.

Clearly, if we want both to survive and have a sustainable future, we need to find a third option, but it is not the one picked by the Trudeau government. You can’t have your pipeline and cancel it, too.

For example, take the proposed carbon tax. By itself, it will not move our society far enough or fast enough toward a sustainable future, but it helps. In addition to somewhat increasing costs for everyone, if it is spent only on reducing greenhouse gas emissions it will generate a new government revenue stream and encourage opportunities for green investment, both of which are needed to leverage the kind of changes we must make.

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Winnipeg Needs Plan For Redevelopment

(September 2, 2016)

Winnipeg needs to open its doors to a larger redevelopment strategy that would build light-rail transit, bike paths and pedestrian corridors to transform it into a world-class city for the 21st century.

Coupled with a free, redesigned public transit system to encourage people to stop driving cars, these strategies could also cut greenhouse gas emissions (which in Manitoba are largely from transportation).

Rail relocation is the place to start. Rather than filling the same potholes, year after year, and building underpasses or bridges — all at a huge expense — the rail yards and main rail lines should be moved outside the city.

To do that, we need a systems perspective on our situation in Winnipeg that deals with more than one thing at a time. Otherwise, we are simply playing Whac-a-Mole — that game at the Red River Ex in which, for every mole you whack with the mallet, two more pop up even faster. It’s a game you can only win by unplugging the machine.

We need to set the question of rail line relocation in a broader context that includes the costs of any proposal and a full cost accounting of business as usual. What are the subsidies involved (obvious and hidden)?

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