The new ‘normal’ won’t look like the old one

(April 24, 2020)

WITH the first probable cases of COVID-19 in Manitoba having been identified on March 12, we have been living with the pandemic and its implications for more than a month and a half.

It is hard to listen to the news, every day, and hear the death tolls around the world. It is hard to read the stories of people who have lost family members, friends and colleagues. It is incredible how much has changed in such a short period of time.

If you offered a silent wish for things to return to “normal” about now, you would not be alone. Yet the pandemic doesn’t have the same effect on everyone. Nor is that desired return to “normal” necessarily a good idea.

If you watch your social media, you will see a wide range of “Living with COVID-19” stories.

There are those with privilege, whose work or income remains uninterrupted, who have no children at home as “co-workers” whom they now have to school, on top of learning to work remotely for employers who expect the same level of performance as before, with perhaps a well-stocked liquor cabinet, a judicious pot supply, Netflix to binge-watch after a nice afternoon nap, or some combination of all three, for these lucky few it has been a pyjamas-clad month, interrupted only by food-delivery services and the occasional awkward Zoom meeting.

That privileged experience jars with the reality of other households, who are confined to smaller spaces, with poor internet or none, without cable television — but still with children to amuse, all day long, because teaching is impossible or impractical. Finding enough food, and praying for the means to buy it, is a constant, daily anxiety — and perhaps something that has never been a concern before, because there once was a steady job that is now gone, maybe for good.

Then there are the people who live alone. For them, isolation really does mean isolation — face-to-face conversation means getting a response from the cat. Electronic devices make some human interaction possible, but require both money and the technical ability to use them. For many seniors, especially those who are now locked into care facilities in an effort to keep them safe, even a telephone may be out of the question.

Some businesses flipped to remote operation in a matter of days; others face closure for longer than they can afford, assuming they are even able to reopen. For millions of Canadians, steady income has stopped, but those Visa bills and mortgage payments keep on coming, with interest rates unchanged. Government help is not fast enough — or not enough, period — and too many people and organizations here are falling through the cracks.

Then there are the essential-services workers, who still have jobs outside the home, but are fraught with anxiety because of the risks they now face, every day, for the same meagre wages as before. New sanitation requirements, shortages of personal protective equipment, stress and tension everywhere they work — on top of the daily concern for their own families — create a perfect mental-health storm.

How much more can we take, and for how much longer? Glib answers from anyone about imminent returns to “normal” are wrong, however, for two reasons:

First, if we return too soon, all these sacrifices will be pointless, as the virus roars back from somewhere else and the second wave starts. What’s more, global problems require global solutions — our lives are interwoven with those of everyone on the planet, and our decisions need to be, too.

Second, there is actually no going back to “the way we were,” except in song. Any person, any business, any organization — and especially any politician — who thinks we will ever go back to the old “normal” is delusional.

Comparisons are already being made to the aftermath of the Great Crash of 1929 and the Great Depression that followed. Add to them the Great War that set up these global disasters, and the world of 1914 was clearly gone forever.

As we approach the 75th anniversary of the end of the Second World War, we need to remember that while U.S. president Franklin Roosevelt’s “New Deal” pulled the United States out of its Depression, in Germany and Italy, a return to prosperity was offered through nationalism, fascism, genocide and war.

I fear we face a similar choice today. Especially after the Great Pandemic, we need a Green New Deal for the planet — the same one that two months ago we apparently couldn’t afford — but attempting a remix instead of the old elitism, economic disparity and racial injustice will only set the stage for further global disaster.

For some readers, such problems seem light years away from what’s happening here. For others, they are already local realities, every day.

Whatever the new “normal” will be, however, it can’t look and feel like the old one, or our troubles are just beginning.

The world of 2019 is gone forever. What better choices will we make together in 2020?

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